Civil War History


Another focus of Eric Saul’s work has been the history of the American Civil War. In 2012, in commemoration of the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War, he created a comprehensive reference website, www.CivilWarLibrary.org

Saul has recently compiled an Encyclopedia of Civil War Biography, which can be viewed on his website AmericanAbolitionists.com. It is a comprehensive list of notable Americans from the mid-19th Century. This constitutes a who's who of America in politics, science, industry, and the arts. These individuals represented both sides of the argument over slavery in the United States. Also included is an extensive list of military and naval officers on both sides of the conflict. For those interested in military and naval officers, we have compiled an edited version with just entries of those military personnel involved in the Civil War: Encyclopedia of Civil War Military Biography. These entries were drawn from the 1886-1889 edition of Appletons' Cyclopaedia of American Biography (6 volumes). There are more than 3,000 individuals in these Encyclopedias.

Saul organized a reading of the names of Union and Confederate killed in action at Gettysburg for the sesquicentennial of the Gettysburg battle, July 3, 2013. This has become an annual program at the Gettysburg National Military Park.

In February 2014, Saul published a website honoring the Union Twelfth Corps in the Civil War (www.Union12thCorps.com). This site will actively seek to obtain retroactive Medals of Honor for officers and soldiers from the Twelfth Corps who served in the Battle for the defense of Culp’s Hill, July 1-3, 1863.

As a follow up, Saul has created an extensive (www.armyofgeorgia.com) website to honor the U.S. Army of Georgia that was created in 1864 under the command of General Henry Warner Slocum. The site documents both the Georgia and the Carolinas campaigns, which were part of General William Tecumseh Sherman’s famous March to the Sea. The site documents the role of the Union Army in enforcing the provisions of the Emancipation Proclamation and the freeing of enslaved individuals along the route of the March.